Beauty Rebranding

Image from Liveurvanity.com
Image from Liveurvanity.com

Yesterday I posted about Estee Lauder’s new sub-brand, The Estee Edit, now available at Sephora.com. The launch comes at no surprise (though much excitement.) Estee Lauder is often seen as a “mature” beauty brand, one that is used by many older women and not as many young faces. As part of this “rejuvination” of sorts, EL picked up KJ as the fresh, new face of the brand, which instantly harnessed much attention from a younger group. The new launch, with fresh and bold new packaging and a brand new feel, is aimed toward a young, trendy group, and is positioned to compete with brands like Urban Decay and Tarte. Will The Estee Edit launch at Sephora be enough to draw in a new market?

I think so.

I appreciate how EL is going about this new branding. New packaging and a new face might not appeal to older clientele, especially those who have been using EL for years and would be thrown off from a new feel. Creating a new line exclusively at Sephora seems to be the right move, and I’m excited to see how it pans out.

Lancome did something similar in recent years. Lancome was (is) also seen as a “mature” beauty brand, one that might not appeal to a younger market. The introduction of brighter, more trendy eyeshadow colors  without a doubt drew in the eyes of younger shoppers, myself included. Lancome’s Spring 2016 lineup is “cute and playful” and definitely is marketed toward young women. Lancome has also recently launched their “Parisian Pop” collection, which has a very  vibrant feel to it, with colorful mascaras and eyeliners.

How about the opposite? I’ve always thought of Maybelline as appealing toward a younger market. They are usually very trendy (and are the first mainstream drugstore beauty brand to launch a black lipstick next season) and their color cosmetics are appealing to a younger crowd. Do you think Maybelline could do more to appeal to a more mature market?

What do you think?

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